Top 10 Reasons for Studying Medicine or Dentistry in Eastern Europe

Many students have been unsuccessful in pursuing medicine or dentistry in their home countries such as UK, Germany, USA. The nature of such courses is highly competitive. Here’s why you should consider studying in Europe:

  • The course is taught entirely in English, with a foreign language class taught a few hours per week to help you fit in to the country and culture. The foreign language class can assist you when you communicate with the local people or with your patients, as well as when interacting in typical every situations with your new international friends.

  • You will be studying medicine or dentistry at some of the best universities in Europe. Even if your grades are not the best, you can still get accepted into some world class university as many Medical Faculties in Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Ukraine and many more allow some flexibility with grade requirements. Universities will not disregard your application and will individually look at your overall performance to give you a chance. Medical Schools in Europe want you to be able to puruse your dream so they’ll give you a chance to study. It then depends on you to keep up with medical school and show them what you’re worth.

  • You’ll be studying medicine or dentistry at some of the largest medical campuses worldwide and largest teaching hospitals in Europe. The universities are all surrounded by very reputable teaching hospitals with many specialties and specialists. Some universities have specific centers like a military hospital or private hospitals with up to date technology, methodology and equipment.

  • Thousands of UK students are opting for studying medicine in Europe. The international community of students from the UK and Germany and other countries is amazing! There are many students who were in your shoes and managed to pursue their dream career abroad, and so should you.

  • Europe is alive, beautiful and safe, you’ll experience a true culturally rich experience.

  • You’ll have an exciting additional option, as opposed to the limited four university options that UCAS in the UK allows you. You can apply to as many medical universities in Europe as you like – your options are limitless. Apply to each university with its procedures and have an unlimited option of universities to choose from.

  • Annual Tuition fees begin from €3000 per year. The tuition is paid in one or two instalments every year. Usually, non-EU applicants must pay the tuition upfront before applying for the visa

  • Living expenses are very low, you can live very comfortably on under €300 per month. Living costs are fantastic and you will love living like a king with such a small amount of money. A Euro or Pound is twice or sometimes thrice as strong as the local currency making everything super cheap.

  • This will be a great back-up option and your safety net incase you are not accepted into medicine back home. Don’t risk losing out on a year of your life because of medical school decided to not accept you, because you’re not the best of the best of the best!

  • You are guaranteed a job after graduation from medical school in Europe as a doctor, as the universities are accepted worldwide.



Source by Osman M

Sadness, Grief, Anger, Resentment – How Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine Can Help

In life there are many genuine reasons to grieve, to feel sad, to get angry or to feel resentful. The death of a loved one, the loss of a job, being disregarded in your work or personal life, the ongoing challenges of the material world that we live in, not feeling fulfilled, dysfunctional relationships, broken relationships, the loss of a pet… the list is almost endless.

What makes the situation even more difficult is that in today’s society we are often under so much stress that the emotion is not given permission to vent or surface properly, which can lead to other difficult emotions and stronger feelings of sadness, grief, anger etc. and it is a self perpetuating situation.

A Look At Sadness, Grieving & Western Medicine
If you are sad or grieving and you live in a “western civilised country” then you may consider going to a doctor. Friends and family may be supportive, but as the emotion/s persists you and your support group may feel there is no better option. In many cases, depending on how the patient expresses these emotions, the doctor may decide to prescribe anti-depressants to help them.

There may be some cases where as a temporary measure this can appear to help, and unfortunately many other cases where it is the slippery slope to a dependency on prescription drugs.

Of course there are also doctors who may recommend counselling or some form of talk therapy, to give the patient the opportunity to deal with and vent the emotion/s.

Regardless of the route that is chosen, Western medicine does not recognise that certain emotions are linked to specific organs, and can therefore have either a detrimental effect or a balancing effect, depending on the degree and type of emotion experienced.

Traditional Chinese Medicine Recognises Relationships Between Emotions And Organs
However traditional Chinese medicine does recognise the relationship between emotions and organs, and it is an integral aspect of how both traditional Chinese acupuncturists and herbalists practice.

Even if you have no interest in going to a traditional Chinese medical practitioner, I have found that even by observing shifts in general well being, when you understand the inter-relationships between emotions and organs, can give some helpful indications of how to begin re-balancing these imbalances.

For example, doing something creative that you enjoy can give you these type of signals. Walking in nature can also do the same, as can reading something enriching. These are only a handful of examples of potentially balancing activities. Please note that although these are helpful, it would be highly recommended to visit a good practitioner who will help you re-balance thoroughly.

In traditional Chinese Medicine there are 7 emotions which are:

1. Anger
2. Anxiety
3. Fear
4. Fright
5. Grief
6. Joy
7. Pensiveness

Each of these is associated to a different organ or organs. Let’s look very briefly at what these are.

1. Anger which encompasses anger as we know it, as well as resentment, frustration and irritability is linked to the liver.

2. Anxiety is connected to the lungs.

3. Fear or perceived fear is linked to the kidneys.

4. Fright is a sudden experience that will initially affect the heart but over time as the fright converts into a conscious fear, then it will also affect the kidneys.

5. Grief has a direct connection to the lungs and if it passes the stage of normal initial grief and manifests into chronic grief, then it may weaken the lungs.

6. Joy is related to the heart. In traditional Chinese medicine the emotion of joy refers to an agitated overexcited state.

7. Pensiveness in TCM (traditional Chinese medicine) refers to over thinking or too much mental stimulation, which relates to the spleen.

These short snippets barely touch on the relationships, which are rather complex and also encompass the five elements (wood, earth, fire, metal and water). However my intention is to introduce the subject at this time, and to examine it in terms of the difficult emotions of sadness and grief, which is illustrated in the following case study.

A Case Study – Grief, Sadness, Stress, Anger And Resentment
A patient of Dr. Jingduan Yang, who is a fourth generation doctor of Chinese medicine, a board certified psychiatrist and a contributor to the Huffington post, is a good case study of grief, sadness, anger, resentment and stress.

This patient, whom he calls “Nancy”, a woman of 30, had been suffering with lower abdomen pain for 3 months, which got worse after drinking cold drinks or eating oily food. A doctor she had attended had prescribed her medication which attacked the symptoms but not the cause, after not being able to discover any physical signs of infection, cancer, inflammation or other tangible condition.

However upon attending Dr. Jingduan Yang, it became apparent that her symptoms were indeed her friends and were desperately trying to tell her something important. “Nancy” had been ignoring the grief of losing a long term friend, which was combined with five years of stress of almost constant relocation and professional pressure.

A difficult routine, eating habits that were not conducive to a balanced life and health, married with grief, sadness, anger and resentment were brought back into balance by a combined holistic approach, which incorporated a course of acupuncture, herbal remedies, meditation, qi gong, and improved dietary and eating habits. This lady was helped to re-balance, as well as understanding the messages which her symptoms were giving and taking part in practices which gave her back more responsibility over her own health.

Grief and sadness are recognised in Chinese medicine to weaken the normal energy flow (qi) of the lungs as well as the large intestines.

Anger and resentment (a form of anger) are recognised to create blockages of energy (qi) and blood in the liver and gallbladder channels. In turn this can result in pain, mood swings, indigestion, insomnia and dysmenorrhea.

This is one case study of hundreds of thousands of studies that traditional Chinese practitioners have all around the world. Even if you feel sceptical about trying TCM, remember it has, and continues to help millions of people deal with the root cause of their imbalances and not just the symptoms. It is a great way to maintain a healthy body, mind and spirit. It can help you understand and deal with your emotions before they become chronic, and can help you re-discover parts of yourself that became drowned in pools of stress and chronic emotions.

If you have been feeling any or some of these emotions, it can be a great relief to deal with them with the aid of a good practitioner.



Source by Jackie A De Burca

Theory of Chinese Traditional Medicine – CTM

Chinese Traditional Medicine (CTM) has a history of more than 5,000 years. It has a complete theory about the occurrence, development and treatment of diseases. According to CTM theory, the occurrence of diseases is the in coordination between Yin and Yang and the treatment of diseases is the reestablishment of the equilibrium between them. Yin and Yang are the two concepts from ancient Chinese philosophy and they represent the two contradictories in everything.

In CTM theory, Yin and Yang are used to explain physiological and pathological phenomena of the body. They are also the principles of diagnosing and treating diseases. Roughly speaking, there are two common ways of CTM curing diseases: drug therapy and non-drug therapy. As for drug therapy, traditional medicines are used such as herbs, mineral, animals, etc. As for non-drug therapy, there are acupuncture and moxibustion, massage, cupping.

According to statistics, Traditional Chinese Medicine is better for the treatment of diseases of viral infections, immune system, cardio-cerebrovascular system and nervous system without causing any side-effects compared with western medicine.

The strength and flexibility of Chinese medicine is a direct result of the Chinese philosophical views and understandings from which the medicine is drawn. Chinese philosophy provides us with different approaches to viewing our nature, the workings of our bodies, the manifestation of disease and the process of healing. While it is true that no single system of philosophy holds all of the answers, the Chinese framework provides us with a wealth of guidance and practical techniques to foster physical and mental health.

If you fancy finding more knoledge and information about organic Chinese natural herbal products, please visit http://www.chineseteaandherbs.com

We simply wish to share valuable healthcare knowledge with people. Of course there are also many products you can buy online, if you wish.



Source by Nick Wang

Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine – Know the Differences

It isn’t unusual to use the terms sports medicine and physical therapy interchangeably. However the two aren’t exactly the same things even though you may find yourself the patient of both fields at the same time.

While compatible, the difference between the two branches of medical discipline is clear. Both are effective for treating injuries, diseases and disorders of the muscle and skeletal systems of the body and both are useful for the prevention of future injury or disease symptom reoccurence. By taking an individual look at both types of medical assistance, you will soon see the differences between physical therapy and sports medicine.

Let’s take a look at the field of physical therapy first. Unlike sports medicine, physical therapy as a whole is devoted to correcting any injury, disease, or disorder of the bones and muscles that can be treated with non invasive techniques. The focus is to provide patients with relief from pain, improve their muscle, joint, and bone function, while providing techniques the patient can use on their own for additional healing. The primary tools of a therapist are good diagnosing and evaluating skills, knowledge of the musculoskeletal system, and knowledge of which therapy is effective for each situation.

One large difference between the two is that physical therapy doesn’t only deal with sports related injuries or problems. Physical therapists can choose to specialize in their careers with emphasis on things like pediatrics, geriatrics, and neurology. Other areas of expertise included in physical therapy are sports, cardiovascular sciences, and occupational therapy.

When you are looking at the differences between these two healing arts you certainly can’t overlook sports medicine. The type of medical discipline is solely used for sports related injuries and disorders. While sports physical therapy techniques are commonly used in addition to sports medicine, sports medicine may involve surgeries, procedures, and medications not used in physical therapy. Sports medicine practitioners also can have specialty fields as well. Orthopedics and skeletal emphasis are common. Advanced study of how long term sporting activities and treating sports related injuries are always a part of this particular discipline.

Understanding the difference between physical therapy and sports medicine may be key to determining how to best treat your physical problem. While they can and are commonly used together, each one has its own distinct benefit. Your medical care team can further help distinguish the two and point you in the right direction in terms of your health care needs. The important thing is take care of any injury, sports related or not, to ensure your body’s function in the years to come.

The difference between these two medical approaches is obvious. Although the two are often used together, each one has its own purpose and uses. Your doctor can give you advice on which specialist is right for your needs.



Source by John Groth

Shamanism – An Alternative to Modern Medicine?

The internet, television, and other news sources are sounding the alarm announcing new protocols for the treatment of diseases. These diseases range from Alzheimer, cancer, diabetes, MS, to Parkinson’s. Within this shout-out is near condemnation of pharmaceuticals and praise for other approaches. The intent here is not to list these approaches or to specifically discuss all of them. One among the many does require attention.

There is a proliferation of shamanic healers and practitioners within the United States. Dozens of organizations offering advice, membership, seminars, and certification abound. A bulging gold mine lights up the horizon of possible candidates for healing.

At this point, it is helpful to define shamanism. There is no need to trace the etymological history of the word. Shamanism is not a cult nor is it a religion even though there is an abundance of evidence that suggests a belief in a divine power circumnavigating the universe. Shamanism is an ancient form of healing. A shaman, despite some attempt to label them as a priest, is simply a healer, that is, one who knows remedies for certain physical issues.

One of several significant markers that distinguish a shaman from a doctor is the recognition that illness may not be just physical, but emotion based. Treating the whole patient is a 40,000 year old approach that is catching on in the 21st Century. Another difference between a shaman and a modern physician is the division of reality into three realms: upper, middle, and lower. And that leads to a third difference: A shaman uses spirit guides as he or she treats a client.

The shaman has a wide knowledge of herbs; whereas, the modern doctor has a depth in what drugs to use. The shaman is nature based and the physician is most likely man-made chemically based. There is a sound movement to make more “drugs” natural based which from some quarters is praise worthy.

A fundamental issue arises from a cleverly clothed advertisement or testimonials praising the marvelous wonder of shamanic healing. Whenever a practitioner proposes a “cure” be very cautious. If you have a pain in your side a shaman may not know that it is appendicitis, indigestion, blocked bowel, or cancer. Accepting shamanic healing as an alternative to modern medicine is a grave mistake. And no pun is intended.

Alternative leaves a bad taste. It implies that there is a better way and that may not be the case. Supportive and interrogative medicine suggests treatment along with current medical practices.



Source by Norman W. Wilson, Ph.D

The Emerging Medicine in Oncology – DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 Mg)

Dasatinib can be seen as one of the preferred medicines for the procedural treatment of CML-CP (chronic-phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia) in salvage and frontline settings. It has been observed that 50 mg of Dasatinib is more effective and tolerated than 100 mg of the daily dose. This was concluded after studies of various cases and their responses. DASAKAST 50

What is Dasatinib?

Dasatinib is a drug used for the treatment of cancer. This drug is used to treat certain cases of leukemia, which is a type of cancer. It can be taken via mouth. The original brand of Dasatinib is Sprycell. Our brand of this drug is Dasakast50. Sprycell 50 mg drug can be used for patients who cannot take other medicines due to side effects or other reasons.

DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg)tablet has the flexibility to be taken with or without a meal, but taking it at a fixed time of the day provides you with the maximum benefits. The doctor will decide upon the frequency of the medicine. Taking excess dosages or improper intake can cause harmful side effects. It can take several months or weeks to begin to show its effects. So, act according to your doctor’s instructions and don’t act according to your own will.

Usage of DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg) Tablet

The dose of DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg) should be taken as advised by your doctor. You can swallow the tablet as a whole. There is no need to break, crush, or chew it. It can be taken with or without a meal, but is advised to take it at a particular time of the day.

If there is a case when you miss a dosage of DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg), then there is no need to double the next dose of the medicine. You can just skip that dose and carry on with the normal schedule you have been following.

Side effects

Many of the side effects that occur while taking this medicine, do not require any particular medical treatment and disappear when your body gets used to DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg) medicine. You can also discuss with your doctor if your side effects worsen in any case.

Some of the usual side effects caused by DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg) tablet are:

  • Anemia (decrease in the number of RBCs)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Infection
  • Breathing problems
  • Low blood platelets
  • Nausea
  • Musculoskeletal pain
  • Rash
  • Vomiting

Working of tablet and quick tips

DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg)acts as an anti-cancer medicine. The working of the tablet is justified by blocking the activity of atypical proteins, giving a signal to cancer cells to multiply themselves. Dasakast50 helps to stop or slow down the multiplication or growth of cancer cells.

Quick tips

  • The side effects may include diarrhea, so drink large amounts of fluid, and discuss with your doctor if it gets more severe.
  • While taking this medicine, use a proper contraceptive method to prevent pregnancy and a month after stopping the medicine.
  • Take note of your blood pressure variation while using this medicine and inform the doctor if facing symptoms of high blood pressure.
  • It may also cause some bleeding problems. If you face problems like stomach pain, headaches, or blood in stools or urine, you should inform your doctor immediately.
  • It is advised to avoid this medicine if you are planning to conceive, are pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

Precautions

  • DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg) is not advised during pregnancy, as it is unsafe for the developing baby. You can consult your doctor for exceptional cases.
  • It is not safe to take the medication while breastfeeding, as it may cause toxicity to the baby.
  • It is advised not to drive while using DASAKAST 50 (Dasatinib 50 mg), as it affects driving or concentration abilities.

Direct Primary Care and Concierge Medicine – What’s the Difference?

The Difference Between Concierge Medicine and Direct Primary Care

Direct primary care (DPC) is a term often linked to its companion in health care, ‘concierge medicine.’ Although the two terms are similar and belong to the same family, concierge medicine is a term that fully embraces or ‘includes’ many different health care delivery models, direct primary care being one of them.

Similarities

DPC practices, similar in philosophy to their concierge medicine lineage – bypass insurance and go for a more ‘direct’ financial relationship with patients and also provide comprehensive care and preventive services for an affordable fee. However, DPC is only one branch in the family tree of concierge medicine.

DPC, like concierge health care practices, remove many of the financial barriers to ‘accessing’ care whenever care is needed. There are no insurance co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance fees. DPC practices also do not typically accept insurance payments, thus avoiding the overhead and complexity of maintaining relationships with insurers, which can consume as much as $0.40 of each medical dollar spent (See Sources Below).

Differences

According to sources (see below) DPC is a ‘mass-market variant of concierge medicine, distinguished by its low prices.’ Simply stated, the biggest difference between ‘direct primary care’ and retainer based practices is that DPC takes a low, flat rate fee whereas omodels, (although plans may vary by practice) – usually charge an annual retainer fee and promise more ‘access’ to the doctor.

According to Concierge Medicine Today (MDNewsToday), the first official news outlet for this marketplace, both health care delivery models are providing affordable, cost-effective health care to thousands of patients across the U.S. MDNewsToday is also the only known organization that is officially tracking and collecting data on these practices and the physicians — including the precise number of concierge physicians and practices throughout the U.S.

“This primary care business model [direct primary care] gives these type of providers the time to deliver more personalized care to their patients and pursue a comprehensive medical home approach,” said Norm Wu, CEO of Qliance Medical Management based in Seattle, Washington. “One in which the provider’s incentives are fully aligned with the patient’s incentives.”

References and Sources

“Doc This Way!: Tech-Savvy Patients and Pros Work Up Healthcare 2.0”. New York Post. 4/7/2009.

Who Killed Marcus Welby? from Seattle’s The Stranger, 1/23/2008

“Direct Medical Practice – The Uninsured Solution to the Primary Medical Care Mess” with Dr. Garrison Bliss (Qliance Medical Group of WA).

“Direct Primary Care: A New Brew In Seattle”. Harvard Medical School – WebWeekly. 2008-03-03.

DPCare.org

Qliance.com

Aromatherapy – Nature’s Fragrant Medicine

We all know how fragrances make us feel. Some aromas make us euphoric, others have a more soothing effect, and specific familiar smells can transport us back in time and bring on feelings of nostalgia. The psychological and emotional effects of fragrance and the extreme importance of our sense of smell are obvious. But, did you know these same fragrances can also be used to heal your body and create well-being in your life? Aromatherapy is a well-known technique amongst healers from all parts of the world and all civilizations.

What do they know that you don’t?

As with Color Therapy, Sound Healing, Crystal Healing, and Energy Therapy, the aim of Aromatherapy, within the scope of healing, is to activate the senses of the body. The goal is to eliminate the conditioned, logical, and analytical mind, thus activating the wonderful reality of “feeling” and experiencing life in it most empirical and purest form. It is in this empirical state, that we are able to break the illusions of separation and connect on a deeper level with the energies that surround us. Dr. Richard Gerber MD, author of Vibrational Medicine, tells us that one of the best ways we can change dysfunctional patterns in our energy bodies is to administer therapeutic doses of frequency-specific energy. We do this by using herbs, crystals, sound, and energy also called vibrational medicines.

It is common knowledge and practice, that scent can affect physical and psychological changes in living beings. We experience it regularly in our daily lives. When we smell a fragrance, it triggers an immediate emotion or feeling, that makes us happy, excited, calm or even nostalgic. Aromatherapy, practiced throughout thousands of years, dating back to the ancient Egyptians and the Vedic culture of India, where plant extracts and medicinal plants are still widely used.

The term Aromatherapy was coined in 1937, by a French perfumer and chemist by the name of Rene-Maurice Gatterfosee. Aromatherapy is the holistic science of utilizing naturally extracted essences from plants to balance, harmonize and promote the health of body, mind, and spirit. Through the knowledgeable and controlled use of essential oils, we are able to achieve physical, emotional health, and overall well-being. As with other holistic practices, Aromatherapy is always used to treat the “whole” person and not just the symptom or the disease.The application of essential oils is historically mentioned countless times and throughout diverse civilizations (Egyptians, Greeks, Romans etc.) for a variety of health-related applications. Today, there are thousands of studies on essential oils. We know that their effectiveness is accurately merited by their composition of very small molecules, that are able to penetrate deeply and quickly into our cells (Transdermal delivery).

The sense of smell is the most neglected of all the senses in humans. This is surprising when we consider that seventy to seventy-five percent of what we perceive as taste, actually comes from our sense of smell. The neurons that sense the odor molecules, lie deep within the nasal cavity, in a patch of cells called the olfactory epithelium. To understand how odor is humanly perceived, it is important to know why the limbic system allows us to behave differently when experiencing different odors. The Limbic system is a complex system of nerves and networks in the brain, involving several areas near the edge of the cortex, related to our instinct and mood. It also controls our most basic emotions (fear, pleasure, anger) and drives (hunger, sex, dominance, care of offspring). A very important aspect of smell is that olfactory neurons make up the only sensory pathway, that is in direct contact with the brain. Because of the close connection to the limbic center, feelings and emotions can naturally be regulated, as well as memory.

The application and uses of Aromatherapy in healing, obey the same Universal Law that everything vibrates at different and specific frequencies. Every atom in the universe has a specific vibratory or periodic motion. Most plants (and animals,) use enzymes to break down molecular components during their life processes. And, each of these enzymes has a unique crystalline form with a specific vibratory frequency. The vibrational frequency of an oil reflects the innate integrity of these elements and the intrinsic enzymes embodied within its substance.

The process of using Aromatherapy in healing treatments is to apply plant-derived oils with the correct matching frequency. Therefore, allowing the physical body to absorb these energetic vibrations and bring the body back to a state of well-being and equilibrium. Essential oils do not resonate with the toxins in our bodies; neither, do they resonate with negative emotions. This incompatibility is what naturally helps remove toxins and toxic energy from our systems. Aromatherapy, energetically speaking, can help dislodge forgotten traumas by surfacing them in our consciousness. For, it is in a state of consciousness that we can face, deal with them, and let them go. The therapeutic properties of this method, create exceptional vibrational remedies, capable of healing or rebalancing the body/mind/soul/spirit. Essential oils can regularly be used in body oils for massage, facial/body lotions and oils, baths, inhalation, diffusion, and on the energy points on your body.

It is fairly simple to integrate Aromatherapy into your daily life. You do not need to be a master of plants and herbs. Choose a few. Learn about their energetic properties. Smell each oil. How do they make you feel? Once you have narrowed down your list and hand chosen your favorites, here are some DIY ideas:

  • Place a few drops on a tissue and place it in the air vents in your car. Enjoy Aromatherapy anywhere you go. No need to schedule extra time to enjoy the benefits of essential oils.
  • You can mix your favorite oils with coconut or jojoba oil (my favorites) and use them instead of your regular perfume.
  • Mix your essential oil in distilled water. Then, using a spray bottle, spray it as an air freshener around the house. You can also spray it on your favorite pillows and throws.

Most Common Ailments Treated in Family Medicine

Family medicine is where most people seek their first line of treatment, only being referred to a specialist if necessary. These medical professionals treat a wide range of ailments across age groups. So what are the most common complaints in family medicine?

1. Aches and Pains

Many patients come in complaining that they are in pain, and there are a variety of different reasons for this. The discomfort may be caused by an injury such as a sprain or strain, a condition such as bursitis or osteoarthritis, or may even be a symptom of another underlying issue. An experienced physician should be able to diagnose the problem based on the location of the pain, when and how it began, and the overall health of the patient.

2. Headaches

Another common complaint is headaches, including migraines. Many issues may cause headaches. A practitioner may diagnose chronic migraines and prescribe medication to ease the painful symptoms. Headaches may also be due to an allergic sensitivity or a nasal infection, such as Sinusitis. An appropriate diagnosis in this situation would be an allergy test to determine the patient’s allergies or antibiotics to treat the infection. If the problem persists, the doctor may suggest an eye exam, MRI, or a CT scan to rule out neurological problems.

3. Cold and Flu Symptoms

Some of the symptoms of cold and flu that doctors commonly see in family medicine include chest congestion with an accompanying cough, fever, aches, tiredness, a sore throat, and a runny nose. Once one person is sick, the cold or flu virus or bacteria will usually make the rounds throughout the whole household. The physician may prescribe antivirals or antibiotics to shorten the duration of the illness and will recommend plenty of rest and fluids until the patient is well.

4. Stomach Pains

Abdominal pain is another common complaint heard by general physicians. Abdominal pain may also be present with symptoms such as diarrhea or constipation and can be either acute or chronic. The practitioner will usually treat the symptoms and make recommendations to prevent dehydration. If the pain is severe and persistent, the doctor may run tests to determine if the patient has ulcers or another condition such as gastritis.

5. Skin Disorders

Many patients come in complaining of a variety of skin disorders, from the minor to the extreme. Some of these disorders might include rashes caused by exposure to an irritant, chronic acne, psoriasis, cysts, and irregular or alarming spots and moles. If initial treatment is unsuccessful, the physician may refer the patient to a dermatologist.

Source by Andrea Avery

Functional Medicine & Chiropractic In Treatment of Concussions

Concussions are a form of traumatic injury to the head accompanied by temporary impairment of brain function. This kind of damage is often referred to as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or mild head injury (MHI) and is one of the most common kinds of external damage in the head and neck region.

In 2013, about 2.8 million traumatic brain injury-related visits to the emergency department took place in the United States. Modern studies reveal that the most common mechanisms of TBI are:

  • Road traffic accidents
  • Falls
  • A hit by or against a certain object

Roughly speaking, all concussions can be divided into two major groups: sports-related and not related to sports. Although the treatment in both cases is roughly universal, patients who had received a sport-related concussion often worry about how quickly they would be able to return to their training sessions, games and tournaments. A major part of the functional treatment of TBI is in explaining the importance of complete recovery before going back to physical activities: this is crucial not only for the patient’s health but also for his or her optimal physical performance.

What Happens During A Concussion?

Regardless of the specific mechanism of the damage, a concussion happens when there is an abrupt and extreme change in speed. For example, when a goalkeeper is hit by a ball in the head, he receives a huge local acceleration – and the skull, being a solid structure, is the first to respond accordingly by moving in the direction of the blow.

The brain, on the other hand, is a “floating” structure suspended in cerebrovascular liquid in the skull, so it takes longer to change its direction and speed of movement. Thus, when a sudden blow to the head is received, the brain is smashed against the cranium, damaging the local soft tissues.

Similarly, when a person is driving a vehicle such as a car or bike, a sudden stop (such as due to a road accident) would cause an abrupt decrease in speed which initially affects the skull: for the next moments, the brain would be still moving in the initial direction thus hitting the skull.

The resulting symptoms from such damage may include:

  • Physical: headache (both local and diffuse), nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity to light and sound, dizziness, seeing flashes of light or blinking stars, blurred vision, tinnitus (ringing in the ears).
  • Emotional and behavioral: depression, anxiety, sleepiness or insomnia, fatigue, irritability.
  • Cognitive: impaired memory and concentration, feeling “slowed down” or “in a fog.”

But that’s just half of the problem. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, people who had suffered from a concussion have significantly increased risk of dying from other medical issues such as:

  • Seizures – 50-fold increase in risk.
  • Accidental drug poisoning – 11-fold increase in risk.
  • Infections – 9-fold increase in risk.
  • Pneumonia – 6-fold increase in risk.

This is why a holistic treatment of concussions is crucial for the long-term health of each and every patient, as it should alleviate not only the initial symptoms, but prevent the development of subsequent health problems as well.

The Conventional Approach to the Treatment of Concussions

In terms of treating concussions, most doctors focus on the principle “prevent additional brain damage.” This is done mainly through the prescription of such medications as painkillers, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (to prevent brain swelling), antibiotics (to prevent infections during the recovery period), antidepressants, and rarely diuretics (to remove excess fluid from the body). Although such an approach is viable and brings a lot of benefits, it almost completely misses the non-brain damage from a concussion, as well as delayed long-term health issues.

Granted, it’s better than nothing but it can hardly be considered an end-to-end therapy. Although this treatment is great in alleviating immediate manifestations, it does not decrease the long-term impact of the injury. In other words, the patient who chooses conventional treatment for his or her concussion might have to resort to medical care years after the injury, often unaware that the damage could have been avoided a long time ago. Luckily, different aspects of functional treatment have been proved to be successful in treating long-term outcomes of traumatic brain injury.

Functional Medicine for the Treatment of Concussions

The human brain is attached to the spinal cord, thus sudden movement of the former inevitably affects the latter. Even if the brainstem is abruptly shifted by a fraction of a millimeter, all sorts of health problems can arise in the entire body as a result of spinal root and nerve dislocation.

This is why spinal manipulation therapy (SMT), as a form of chiropractic treatment, proves to be so effective in treating traumatic events of the cervical spine, which are often accompanied by concussions. Besides improving long-term outcome, it also decreases pain, increases the range of motion, and alleviates local muscle spasm.

Source by Ann Barter

Add to cart
Open chat